Porcupine Season 1, Episode 2

Northern Reality and Reconciliation Part 1

With: Tony Penikett
Tony Penikett - Hunting the Northern Character - First Nations Reconciliation

You can listen to the episode by clicking the “play” button in the audio player above or by downloading it in Apple Podcast, Spotify, Google, or your favorite podcast platform.

Help new listeners discover Porcupine by leaving us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Have a question, comment or suggestion? Get in touch by email, on Twitter or in the comments below. 

  27:24

     Guests

  • Tony Penikett

       In This Episode

    Hosts

  • Merrell-Ann Phare
  • Michael Miltenberger

     Related Tags

About This Episode

Northern Reality and Reconciliation Part 1 with Tony Penikett

Today, author and former Premier of the Yukon Tony Penikett talks about reconciliation within and between governments. He discusses his new book, Hunting the Northern Character. He also touches on where Canada’s been, where it’s going, and how northern governments have approached these issues.

Next: Listen to Northern Reality and Reconciliation Part 2 with Tony Penikett here.

About Our Guest

Tony Penikett

Tony spent 25 years in public life, including two years at the Canadian House of Commons as Chief of Staff to federal New Democratic Party Leader Ed Broadbent; five terms in the Yukon Legislative Assembly; and two terms as Premier of Canada’s Yukon Territory. His government negotiated settlements of Yukon First Nation land claims; passed pioneering legislation in the areas of education, health, language; and organised Yukon 2000, a unique bottom-up economic planning process. After serving as Premier of the Yukon, Penikett acted as Senior Aboriginal Policy Advisor for the Premier of Saskatchewan (1995-97) and Deputy Minister for Negotiations, and later Labour, for the Government of British Columbia (1997-2001).

Read the rest of Tony’s bio on The Polar Connection

Tony Says:

>> 00:01: “In Whitehorse, at that time, it was fairly clear that most of the poor people were Indigenous. And most Indigenous people were poor.”  – Tony Penikett

>>12:59: “We were able to do that because for the first and only time in Yukon history where we’ve had a party system… Since right from the beginning in 1898, was that… Half of my caucus colleagues in the governing party in the New Democratic party congress were Indigenous people.”  – Tony Penikett

>>17:43: “And one of the things that one of the Chiefs said, which struck all of us was, “Look, we were promised social license on major projects that impacted our communities. We were promised free prior and informed consent before any major projects come through. What we got was drive-by consultation.” – Tony Penikett

In This Episode

Other Ways to Enjoy Northern Reality and Reconciliation Part 1:

Northern Reality and Reconciliation Part 1 Transcript

How To Help

You can listen to the episode by clicking the “play” button in the audio player above or by downloading it in Apple Podcast, Spotify, Google, or your favorite podcast platform.

Help new listeners discover Porcupine by leaving us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Have a question, comment or suggestion? Get in touch by email, on Twitter or in the comments below. 

Episode 0: Meet the Hosts – Merrell-Ann Phare and Michael Miltenberger

Episode 1: CLI Elders Explain Reconciliation with Stan McKay, Garry McLean, and Rodney Burns

Episode 2: Northern Reality and Reconciliation with Tony Penikett – Part 1

Episode 3: Northern Reality and Reconciliation with Tony Penikett – Part 2

Episode 4: Water and Reconciliation – CWRA Live Taping

Episode 5: The Role of Indigenous Taxation in Reconciliation with Manny Jules

Episode 6: Indigenous Economics and Reconciliation with Andre Le Dressay

Episode 7: Sports and Reconciliation with Patti-Kay Hamilton

Episode 8: Indigenous Law, Consent and Reconciliation with Bruce McIvor

Episode 9: Hip Hop and Reconciliation with Crook the Kid

Episode 10: The Importance of Treaty Land Entitlement with Laren Bill

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